food pairing: southwestern chayote casserole with the words of Gloria Anzaldua

Last night I made dinner for my wonderful parents and tried out the Southwestern Chayote Casserole recipe from Susan Voisin over at the FatFree Vegan Kitchen that I mentioned a few blogs back. It turned out great, even for an amateur in the kitchen like myself.

 Following are the words of Gloria Anzaldua.The U.S.-Mexican border es una herida abierta where the Third World grates against the first and bleeds. And before a scab forms it hemorrhages again, the lifeblood of two worlds merging to form a third country—a border culture. Borders are set up to define the places that are safe and unsafe, to distinguish us from them. A border is a dividing line, a narrow strip along a steep edge. A borderland is a vague and undetermined place created by the emotional residue of an unnatural boundary. It is in constant state of transition. The prohibited and forbidden are its inhabitants. Los atravesados live here: the squint-eyed, the perverse, the queer, the troublesome, the mongrel, the mulato, the half-breed, the half dead; in short, those who cross over, pass over, or go through the confines of the “normal” (p. 25).

It's easy as 1, 2, 3. First chop, then stew & simmer, and next bake!

It’s easy as 1, 2, 3. First chop, then stew & simmer, and next bake!

She has this fear               that she has no names                  that she has many names            that she doesn’t know her names                 She has this fear               that she’s an image         that comes and goes clearing and darkening                       the fear that she’s the dreamwork inside someone else’s skull                   She has this fear               that if she takes off her clothes                                 shoves her brain aside peels off her skin               that if she drains              the blood vessels             strips the flesh from the bone       flushes out the marrow                                She has this fear               that when she does reach herself                turns around to embrace herself              a lion’s or witch’s or serpent’s head                        will turn around swallow her and grin                She has this fear that if she digs into herself        she won’t find anyone                  that when she gets “there”                she won’t find her notches on the tree                 the birds will have eaten all the crumbs              She has this fear that she won’t find the way back  (p. 65).

and voila! topped with a homemade cornbread topping! happy eating, friends!

and voila! topped with a homemade cornbread topping. happy eating, friends!

The first time I heard two women, a Puerto Rican and a Cuban, say the word “nosotras,” I was shocked. I had not known the word existed. Chicanas use nosotros whether we’re male or female. We are robbed of our female being by the masculine plural. Language is a male discourse (p. 26).

Anzaldua, Gloria. Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza. Aunt Lute Books, 1987.

Hungry? Check out the Southwestern Chayote Casserole recipe from Susan Voisin over at the FatFree Vegan Kitchen.

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